Medical Standards

ICD-9

The ICD-9 was published by the WHO in 1977. According to the World Health Organization Department of Knowledge Management and Sharing, the WHO no longer publishes or distributes the ICD-9 which is now public domain

ICD-9-CM

International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) is a classification used in assigning codes to diagnoses associated with inpatient, outpatient, and physician office utilization in the U.S. The ICD-9-CM is based on the ICD-9 but provides for additional morbidity detail and is annually updated on October 1. It was created by the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics as an extension of ICD-9 system so that it can be used to capture more morbidity data and a section of procedure codes was added

ICD-10

10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases, signs and symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). The code set allows more than 14,400 different codes and permits the tracking of many new diagnoses. Using optional sub classifications, the codes can be expanded to over 16,000 codes. Using codes that are meant to be reported in a separate data field, the level of detail that is reported by ICD can be further increased, using a simplified multi axial approach.

ICD-10-CM

International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) provided by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), for medical coding and reporting in the United States. The ICD-10-CM is a morbidity classification for classifying diagnoses and reason for visits in all American health care settings. The ICD-10-CM is based on the ICD-10, the statistical classification of disease published by the World Health Organization (WHO) which replaces ICD-9.

HL7

Health Level Seven (HL7), is an all-volunteer, non-profit organization involved in development of international healthcare informatics interoperability standards."HL7" is also used to refer to some of the specific standards created by the organization (e.g., HL7 v2.x, v3.0, HL7 RIM)
HL7 and its members provide a framework (and related standards) for the exchange, integration, sharing, and retrieval of electronic health information. v2.x of the standards, which support clinical practice and the management, delivery, and evaluation of health services, are the most commonly used in the world.

CPT

The Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code set is maintained by the American Medical Association through the CPT Editorial Panel. The CPT code set accurately describes medical, surgical, and diagnostic services and is designed to communicate uniform information about medical services and procedures among physicians, coders, patients, accreditation organizations, and payers for administrative, financial, and analytical purposes.

ISBT 128

ISBT 128 is a system for identification, labeling and processing of human blood, tissue, and cellular therapy products using an internationally standardized system. The acronym ISBT stands for the International Society of Blood Transfusion. The number 128 reflects the choice of barcode symbology known as Code 128.

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996 (P.L.104-191) [HIPAA] was enacted by the U.S. Congress in 1996. It was originally sponsored by Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Sen. Nancy Kassebaum (R-Kan.). Title I of HIPAA protects health insurance coverage for workers and their families when they change or lose their jobs. Title II of HIPAA, known as the Administrative Simplification (AS) provisions, requires the establishment of national standards for electronic health care transactions and national identifiers for providers, health insurance plans, and employers.